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Cinema

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RETRO

A nostalgic (but not blindly nostalgic) look back at some cult and classic movies. Are they worth checking out once you take off the rose-tinted glasses? Find out in this retrospective section.

Blue Velvet (1986) written and directed by David Lynch

Don the gas mask for this analysis of the surreal director's subconsciously disturbing classic starring Kyle MacLachlan, Isabella Rossellini and Dennis Hopper.

Blue Velvet (1986) titles

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The Cook, the Thief, His Wife & Her Lover (1989)

Welsh director Peter Greenaway's most controversial yet accessible film: a scathing and gruesome satire of Thatcher-era consumerism.

Alan Howard, Helen Mirren and Michael Gambon in The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover

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Witchfinder General (1968) directed by Michael Reeves

An interesting if somewhat overrated folk horror cum transplanted western set during the British Civil War, starring Vincent Price and Ian Ogilvy.

A hanging in Witchfinder General

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Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer (1986) starring Michael Rooker

John McNaughton's portrayal of self-confessed serial killer Henry Lee Lucas is a bleak, violent and disturbing plunge into a metaphorical sewer.

Michael Rooker as Henry Lee Lucas

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Hellraiser (1987)

Clive Barker has such sights to show you in his directorial debut.

Pinhead in Hellraiser

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​Lifeforce (1985)

A love-hate relationship with this space sex vampire flick from Cannon Pictures.

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White Dog (1982)

Samuel Fuller's White Dog is commendable for its approach to the thorny subject matter of racism.


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​Peeping Tom (1960)

Michael Powell's controversial masterpiece no longer shocks outright but it's still a slyly relevant and suggestively disturbing piece of cinematic art.

Peeping Tom (1960)


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​The Sorcerers (1967)

Crimes committed by mind control in Michael Reeves's cult favourite.

Boris Karloff in Michael Reeves' The Sorcerers

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