x
Hey there, it's just the usual obligatory message to inform you that this site uses cookies. Click here to find out more about our privacy policy or alternatively click the X on the top-right if you would rather just get on with the movie reviewing fun.
Cinema

Frank Sidebottom The Home of the Retrospective

ON IN CINEMAS

EIFF 2018: Several Conversations About a Very Tall Girl (2017)

Silvana Mihai and Florentina Nastase play a lesbian couple with their differences on how 'out' they are in a drama directed by Bogdan Theodor Olteanu which has been dubbed 'the Romanian Blue Is The Warmest Colour’.

Several Conversations About a Very Tall Girl

Click here to read review
Comments

EIFF 2018: Ideal Home (2018) starring Paul Rudd and Steve Coogan

The double act of Paul Rudd and Steve Coogan, playing a wealthy gay couple suddenly saddled with a surrogate son (Jack Gore), generates enough hilarity to offset this film's soft and predictable approach to drama. Coogan, in particular, essays another of his classic celebrity buffoons.

Steve Coogan and Paul Rudd in Ideal Home

Click here to read review
Comments

EIFF 2018: Winterlong (2018) written and directed by David Jackson

This father-son reconciliation drama features fine performances and solid characterisations across the board. While there are a few obvious contrivances and unresolved subplots, the film still manages to distinguish itself from others of its ilk.

Harper Jackson in Winterlong

Click here to read review
Comments

EIFF 2018: The Devil Outside (2018) starring Mark Stobbart

An adolescent boy (played by Noah Carson) is torn between his mother's religious fundamentalism and the influence of a delinquent best friend in this psychological drama. Andrew Hulme's film works better when concentrating on visual storytelling than on its hamfisted dialogue and characterisations.

The Devil Outside (2018)

Click here to read review
Comments

EIFF 2018: Obey (2018) written and directed by Jamie Jones

This depiction of the 2011 London riots and the origins of the anger lying behind Britain's socially disenfranchised has enough raw immediacy and heartbreaking social realism to overcome its low-budget action scenes and occasionally stereotyped characters.

Obey (2018) written and directed by Jamie Jones

Click here to read review
Comments

EIFF 2018: The Parting Glass (2018) directed by Stephen Moyer

True Blood star Stephen Moyer’s big screen directorial debut is an impressively naturalistic ensemble piece about the grieving process. The film's subtle puzzle-style approach to narrative might not be for everyone but the characters here come across like real human beings.

The Parting Glass (2018)

Click here to read review
Comments

EIFF 2018: Lucid (2018) starring Billy Zane and Sadie Frost

The story behind the making of this film is incredible, as is its core idea. Unfortunately, the execution is dull. Some appealing neon-drenched cinematography and a quirky turn by Billy Zane (not typecast as a boo-hiss villain for a change) fail to save it.

Laurie Calvert and Billy Zane in Lucid

Click here to read review
Comments

EIFF 2018: Old Boys (2018) directed by Toby MacDonald

This Cyrano de Bergerac adaptation, set in a posh English boarding school, is marred by rather forced and weak humour. Nonetheless, it has a certain amount of charm as well as fine performances from Alex Lawther, Pauline Étienne and the rest of the cast.

Alex Lawthor in Old Boys (2018)

Click here to read review
Comments

EIFF 2018: Puzzle (2018) starring Kelly Macdonald

A small-town American housewife finds both passion and a new direction in life thanks to jigsaw puzzles and her relationship with an eccentric inventor (played by Irrfan Khan). It's a quietly impressive small gem of a film with characters who feel real.

Kelly Macdonald in Puzzle (2018)

Click here to read review
Comments

Hereditary (2018) written and directed by Ari Aster

This slow-burning horror chiller may reference other classic genre entries - from The Exorcist and Suspiria to Don't Look Now - but still manages to stand out due to its studied slice-of-life family drama mixed with effectively-deployed shocks.

Hereditary directed by Ari Aster

Click here to read review
Comments

More cinema releases

CLICK HERE for a guide to the best independent cinemas in Edinburgh and Glasgow.

DVD/BLU RAY

Donald Sutherland in Apprentice to Murder

ARTICLES

Obey, written and directed by Jamie Jones

RETRO

Erik the Conqueror directed by Mario Bava

Simon Dwyer banner