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Cinema

Frank Sidebottom The Home of the Retrospective

ON IN CINEMAS

First Man (2018) dir: Damien Chazelle, starring Ryan Gosling

Neil Armstrong, the first man on the moon, is examined in Damian Chazelle's respectable biopic. For all of its awe-inducing, white-knuckle depictions of space flight, however, it feels more like a small step for filmmaking than the giant leap that it should have been.

First Man (2018)

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A Star is Born (2018) starring Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper

This fourth incarnation of William A. Wellman and Robert Carson's story turns out to be far from the Cooper/Gaga vanity project that you might have feared. Even Andrew Dice Clay is great in a film whose emotional imprint will stay with you for a long time.

Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga in A Star is Born (2018)

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Lucky (2017) starring Harry Dean Stanton and David Lynch

Lucky is both a detailed final snapshot of a fine American character actor and a touching, often funny rumination on human mortality. While there's an inevitable tincture of sadness here, it's nowhere near as depressing a film as you might expect.

Harry Dean Stanton is Lucky

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Cold War (2018) directed by Pawel Pawlikowski

A romance takes place on both sides of the Iron Curtain during the early days of the Cold War. Shot in a warm sepia monochrome and featuring a prevalence of diverse music, this is one of those rare movies which you can enjoy as a sensory, magical experience while barely contemplating the dark central story.

Joanna Kulig and Tomasz Kot in Cold War (2018)

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BlacKkKlansman (2018) directed by Spike Lee

The Do the Right Thing director returns to form with a more poised and deliberate, yet still powerfully relevant, look at racism in America. John David Washington is a livewire revelation as Ron Sallworth, a black man who talks his way into the KKK in the 1970s.

Adam Driver and John David Washington in BlacKkKlansman

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EIFF 2018: Several Conversations About a Very Tall Girl (2017)

Silvana Mihai and Florentina Nastase play a lesbian couple with their differences on how 'out' they are in a drama directed by Bogdan Theodor Olteanu which has been dubbed 'the Romanian Blue Is The Warmest Colour’.

Several Conversations About a Very Tall Girl

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EIFF 2018: Ideal Home (2018) starring Paul Rudd and Steve Coogan

The double act of Paul Rudd and Steve Coogan, playing a wealthy gay couple suddenly saddled with a surrogate son (Jack Gore), generates enough hilarity to offset this film's soft and predictable approach to drama. Coogan, in particular, essays another of his classic celebrity buffoons.

Steve Coogan and Paul Rudd in Ideal Home

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EIFF 2018: Winterlong (2018) written and directed by David Jackson

This father-son reconciliation drama features fine performances and solid characterisations across the board. While there are a few obvious contrivances and unresolved subplots, the film still manages to distinguish itself from others of its ilk.

Harper Jackson in Winterlong

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EIFF 2018: The Devil Outside (2018) starring Mark Stobbart

An adolescent boy (played by Noah Carson) is torn between his mother's religious fundamentalism and the influence of a delinquent best friend in this psychological drama. Andrew Hulme's film works better when concentrating on visual storytelling than on its hamfisted dialogue and characterisations.

The Devil Outside (2018)

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EIFF 2018: Obey (2018) written and directed by Jamie Jones

This depiction of the 2011 London riots and the origins of the anger lying behind Britain's socially disenfranchised has enough raw immediacy and heartbreaking social realism to overcome its low-budget action scenes and occasionally stereotyped characters.

Obey (2018) written and directed by Jamie Jones

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More cinema releases

CLICK HERE for a guide to the best independent cinemas in Edinburgh and Glasgow.

DVD/BLU RAY

Night of the Demon (1957)

ARTICLES

Obey, written and directed by Jamie Jones

RETRO

Erik the Conqueror directed by Mario Bava

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